Welcome to OncoBites!

Here at OncoBites, a team of cancer professionals and advocates has gathered to share cutting-edge research with a non-specialist audience. We understand that jargon and isolated professional communities have made science feel inaccessible to most people, even people considering the field. In addition, paywalls on articles can make trying to investigate topics alone a challenge.... Continue Reading →

Featured post

The Gender Dilemma

Reading time: 3 minutes Bekah Schulz It is well known that biological sex is an important factor in certain types of cancer. Obvious cancers that fall into this category are breast, prostate, uterine, and cervical cancer. These depend on sex-specific organs, as well as hormone levels, that vary between men and women. A previous Oncobites... Continue Reading →

Obesity-related cancers are on the rise

Reading time: 4 minutes Morgan McSweeney Did you know that there is a link between excess weight and increased risk of getting cancer? The International Agency for Research on Cancer has recognized a link between being overweight and having an increased risk of cancer in 13 sites of the body. Strikingly, the CDC reported that... Continue Reading →

BiTE Molecules for Cancer Therapy

Reading time: 3 minutes Aishwarya Subramanian Cancer immunotherapy has gained a lot of traction in the last few years, as several novel therapeutics have made their way into the clinic. Among these new therapeutics, bispecific antibodies are some of the most unique. Unlike traditional antibodies, which have two arms that bind to the same molecule,... Continue Reading →

A Profile of Electric Fields in Cancer Therapeutics

Reading time: 5 minutes Michael Marand For decades, cancer therapy has been dominated by surgical resection, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. But each of these methods comes with its limitations. Surgery fails when there are scattered, small bits of tumor that escape to other areas of the body, called metastases. Radiation therapy fails when said metastases... Continue Reading →

Tomosynthesis: The Latest in Breast Cancer Imaging

Reading time: 4 minutes Taylor A. Johnson Here at OncoBites, we have covered multiple advancements in the imaging and diagnosis of cancer. These have included isotonic labeling to detect the cancer progression, liquid biopsies for uncovering tumor profiles, and even artificial intelligence for interpreting images. In addition, several aspects of breast cancer, ranging from new... Continue Reading →

Listen to me!

When patients volunteer to participate in a clinical trial, their voices should be heard. Reading time: 7 minutes Patty Spears A recent study (Nyrop et. al. 2019) looked at how clinicians and patients reported numbness and tingling in the patient’s hands and feet (peripheral neuropathy) after getting chemotherapy for breast cancer. They call this chemotherapy... Continue Reading →

Sniffing out Cancer

Reading time: 4 minutes Rachel Cherney Early cancer detection is critical for increasing patient survivability; however, current methods for early detection are costly and often inaccurate. It is of great importance to find other, more cost effective and accurate methods for early cancer detection, and to do this, we may need to turn to new... Continue Reading →

Pembrolizumab – the miraculous drug

Reading time: 5 minutes Varshit Dusad A cancer diagnosis is generally perceived to be a death sentence. With millions of people dying of cancer every year, this does not seem to be at all outrageous. However, researchers all over the world, in academia and industry alike, have been relentlessly pursuing novel therapies and drugs to... Continue Reading →

Malignant Costs of Cancer Care

Reading time: 6 minutes Nisitha Sengottuvel So far, a lot of the articles we have been discussing here on Oncobites have been revolving around bench research regarding cancer biology and therapeutics. On the public health side of cancer care, there are a lot of emerging fields: one of which investigates the economic burden  of cancer... Continue Reading →

It takes two brakes to stop cancer?

Reading time: 4 minutes Manisit Das In the past, we have discussed checkpoint inhibitors - therapies that block communication between cancer and immune cells, preventing cancer cells from evading the immune system. Dr. James Allison and Dr. Tasuku Honjo, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine in 2018 for their pioneering work in cancer immunotherapy... Continue Reading →

The Rehabilitation of Thalidomide

Reading time: 4 minutes You may have heard of the infamous thalidomide, a morning sickness drug that was patented in the 1950s. Its potent anti-nausea effects made it ideal as a remedy for morning sickness in pregnant women and thalidomide was sold in over 40 countries, going as far as to be made available over... Continue Reading →

Natural Products for cancer research

Reading time: 3 minutes Bekah Schulz Natural products, or compounds isolated from plants/microorganisms, have been used as herbal medicines throughout human history. These compounds have many measurable effects. In fact, ⅓ of the top selling pharmaceuticals are natural products or their derivatives. Many antibiotics were discovered from screening these compounds and recently have shown efficacy... Continue Reading →

Evolution of chemotherapy: A look back in time

Reading time: 5 minutes Payal Yokota Chemotherapy (chemo) can be prescribed alone and in combination with other therapies such as surgery, radiation, and immunotherapies (ie. vaccines, checkpoint blockade, etc).  Since its discovery, the chemo field has greatly advanced, both in its development and ability to treat cancers. While surgery and radiation act locally to remove... Continue Reading →

Players in Cancer Metastasis: Part Two

Reading time: 4 minutes Shaye Hagler            For those of you whose lives have been impacted by cancer, you might have heard of the term “metastasis.” We call cancer metastatic when it breaks off from the initial tumor and travels to other organs. You might also have heard it being referred to before as “stage 4... Continue Reading →

Going on the offense: PROTACs as cancer therapy

Reading time: 3 minutes Kedar Puvar Diseases are typically caused by defective or malicious proteins. Traditionally, treatments for these diseases use a strategy of inhibition - use a small molecule that can block the offending protein from carrying out its function and thereby, bring things back to normal. But what if we went one step... Continue Reading →

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